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By: Oksana Kishchuk

For many of us, a new year symbolizes a fresh start. A time for resolutions, resets and redefining our goals. But we are curious, are Canadians starting 2023 off on the right foot? How many of us had a positive mindset heading into 2023? Well, we looked into our happiness monitor numbers for some insights.

Heading into 2023 the average happiness score was 6.56.

The average Canadian ranks their happiness at a 6.56/10. Happiness is tied to:

  • Gender- men are much happier than women
  • Age- those 60+ are much happier than the rest of us
  • Location- those in Quebec are much happier than average

 

Happiness and money concerns are linked.

Inflation and the rising cost of living continue to be significant stressors for many Canadians. Therefore, it comes as no surprise that financial situations are linked to our happiness.

Happiness is tied to:

  • Income- a household income of $100k or higher means higher levels of happiness
  • Worries about inflation- higher than average happiness for those who are not worried, lower than average happiness for those who are very worried about inflation

 

Things aren’t all bad. Our end-of-year happiness scores have been slowly increasing over the last three years.

This is the happiest ‘new year’ we’ve had in three years.

 

We’ve been measuring the happiness of Canadians for the last three years, and this past December was our happiest yet. Whether it be the increase in gatherings over the holidays this year or our emergence (hopefully) from COVID, Canadians are starting this new year off on a better foot than years before.

THE UPSHOT

As we enter 2023 a lot lies ahead. Canada, and the world is poised for a lot of negatives, but also positives. It seems Canadians have chosen to focus their outlook on the later, focusing on the new beginning and a chance for a reset that the new year offers.

 

 

METHODOLOGY

This survey was conducted with 1,656 Canadian adults from December 9th to 14th 2022.  The margin of error for a comparable probability-based random sample of the same size is +/- 2.408%, 19 times out of 20.

The margin of error for a comparable probability-based random sample of the same size is +/- 2.408%, 19 times out of 20.

The data was weighted according to census data to ensure that the sample matched Canada’s population. Totals may not add up to 100 due to rounding.

Good Decisions Require Good Data.